Wondering how to make Maitake Mushroom tea? It’s easy as

Powedered Maitake Mushroom jar sitting on table with magazine and cup of tea.

Maitake mushrooms are said to have incredible healing properties. In fact, the name Maitake means ‘dancing mushroom’ in Japanese. Legend has it, foragers would dance with happiness when they found Maitake in the wild. And for good reason. 

Maitake is an adaptogen, which means it is a food that may boost your body’s ability to cope with (or recover from) physical, environmental, or mental stress.

Why drink Maitake tea?

Believe it or not, Maitake tea is made with Maitake mushrooms. They grow wild in parts of Japan, China, and North America and have been used in traditional medicine for thousands of years, thanks to its effect on overall health and energy levels. 

Maitake mushrooms are nutritional powerhouses, packed with antioxidants, beta glucans, vitamins B and C, amino acids, as well as minerals like copper, potassium and fibre.

 

Why learn how to make Maitake tea?

First things first: there are lots of reasons why adding Maitake tea to your diet can improve your wellness. But don’t forget —Maitake is powerful. 

Speak to your doctor about whether Maitake mushrooms are right for you because they can interact with other treatments. If you’re prepping for (or recovering from) surgery, it’s a good idea to give Maitake a miss for a month or so. In the meantime, check out these potential benefits:

Maitake tea for the immune system

When it comes to antioxidants, Maitake packs a punch. Not only that, Maitake is high in beta-glucan, D-fraction, MD-fraction, and SX-fraction. These are protein polysaccharides that have been found to have a positive impact on the immune system. Coming into flu season and with other bugs on the radar, you might do well to add Maitake to your regime. 

Remember, both fresh, liquid and powdered mushrooms hold high antioxidant levels — and mushrooms have heaps of other benefits, too. Learn more about them here.

 

Maitake tea for heart health

Another powerful polysaccharide in Maitake mushrooms is beta glucan. This fungi gem can help reduce your LDL cholesterol (the “bad” one) without affecting your triglyceride (“good”) cholesterol levels. 

You probably already know that having high cholesterol levels isn’t great news. But reducing your cholesterol can boost your artery functionality and lower your risk of heart disease. Better cardiovascular health is definitely good news! 


Maitake tea for blood sugar

A 2015 study found that Maitake mushrooms had positive effects on rats with type 2 diabetes. Further study is needed, but it points to Maitake’s potential to help with type 2 diabetes and healthy blood sugar levels in humans. 


How to make Maitake tea

If you’re keen on a simple, no fuss way to get the benefits of Maitake tea, just add a teaspoon of powdered Maitake Medicinal Mushrooms to whatever you’re drinking. Our founder, Graham, is also a fan of the yoghurt method. We asked him to elaborate and he said “you just put it in your yoghurt,” which seems easy enough🙃

If you’re keen on something with a bit more pizazz, try these recipes on for size. 

Herbal Maitake tea

Stir ½ to one teaspoon of Maitake medicinal mushroom powder into 250ml of hot water. Sweeten to taste with honey or stevia — then take a lap around the garden. Mint, sage, and lemon all make great additions to Maitake tea. If you prefer a creamier beverage, use hot milk or a milk substitute of your choice.


Make your Maitake tea a hot chocolate

Combine hot water with ½ to one teaspoon of Maitake medicinal mushroom powder. Allow this mixture to steep for a few minutes. Top up with ¼ cup of milk or milk substitute, a teaspoon raw cacao, and a teaspoon of honey.

Blitz in the blender for a foamy top.


Produced with care

All our medicinal mushroom supplements are processed in our Class-100 laboratory in Denmark, Western Australia. We grow many species ourselves, but when it comes to Maitake, we rely on certified organic imported mushrooms. Strong relationships with our growers mean you can be sure you’re getting the most potent possible mushroom products.  

If you’re keen to learn more, find out the benefits of Chaga tea here. You might also be interested in the secret the medicinal mushroom industry in Australia doesn’t want you to know as well as the method of dual extraction we use to access all the benefits of medicinal mushrooms. Check them out!


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